The Geographer

anotherafrica:

Berlin to Bulawayo: In Conversation with South African artist Thabiso Sekgala

In his photographs, Thabiso Sekgala explores the relationship between geography and social identity. He gives his series allusive, meditative titles, and his formal approach to composition is quiet but precise. Working consistently with square-framed, medium format film, he displays a sharpened consideration of geometry, illustrated by aspects in the landscape such as shadows, the painted guidelines on a street, architectural structures, and repetitive details.

Read the interview.

SOURCE | ANOTHERAFRICA.NET

Images courtesy of Thabiso Sekgala and The Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg and Cape Town. All rights reserved.

ANOTHERAFRICA.NET | TUMBLR | FACEBOOK | TWITTER | INSTAGRAM

yagazieemezi:

PORTRAITS DE FEMMES, ALGERIA.

In 1960 Marc Garanger was stationed against his will in Algeria, and managed to avoid combat by becoming a photographer in the French army.His job was to produce images for new mandatory ID cards, and villagers were forced to sit for him. As a part of its unsuccessful effort to block the Algerian push for independence, the French government introduced identity cards as a security measure – all Algerians had to carry an ID card. However the portraits Garanger produced in his series Women Unveiled were unlike most portraits. The women did not wish to be photographed, and were also forcibly unveiled. They were forced to pose before a photographer who was a serving French soldier and who was accompanied by other French troops.

“I would come within three feet of them,” Garanger remembers“They would be unveiled. In a period of ten days, I made two thousand portraits, two hundred a day. The women had no choice in the matter. Their only way of protesting was through their look.”

Decades later, Omar D.  responded to Garanger’s series, with his own vision of a country with a rich, yet unknown cultural heritage, by showing the veiled women of Algeria, in the majesty in their traditional costumes. With Potraits de Femmes series, he tries to restore the dignity and respect such women were denied within Garanger’s pho

ukpuru:

blood—sport:

Important things from Igbohistory Instagram. European colonialism has, and still continues to dismantle the myriad of sophisticated social constructs upheld by so many African ethnicities, by presenting Africa as a unit by choosing to ignore the huge ocean of differences between ethnic groups, let alone countries.

Interesting fact: Many African ethnic groups, kingdoms, and states were referred to as ‘countries’ before the rise of colonial powers throughout Africa. They were okay as ‘countries’ when slaves and other goods were being traded. You’ll hear of the Ebo country, Benin Country, Whydah Country and so on when reading pre-1850 writing. If you label a kingdom or a state a ‘tribe’ this those what is described above but also implies there was no major or important political organisation. ‘Tribe’ made/makes indigenous African states and ethnic affiliations sound petty and unimportant. Imagine calling the Edo or Songhai people a tribe when their empires have wielded more power than most of the world ever has? But why would you call them countries when you’re trying to impose your own country on them?

Africa, labelling

elliehattephotography:

Koforidua - The capital of the Eastern Region, Ghana 

Africa, Ghana

yagazieemezi:

Female-run cereal banks help families facing food crisis in Niger

“Before cereal and grain banks were always managed by men, with the stock sold to generate money,” says Vincenzo Galastro, IFAD’s country portfolio manager, based in Niger. “These banks are managed by women, and the repayment of stock is carried out by villagers, which allows the most vulnerable families to ensure food security.” Currently more than 50,000 women are involved in the management of the banks, and this number is increasing.

Keep reading

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

yagazieemezi:

Know Safa Idriss Nour (then & now)

Super model Waris Dirie Somali model insisted Safa Idriss Nour, the child who played her suffering FGM in biopic, had to be spared the same fate

When she was three years old, Safa Idriss Nour received something no girl in her slum in Djibouti had been given before – a signed contract from her parents stating they would never inflict genital mutilation on her.

In Djibouti, in the Horn of Africa, an estimated 98% of girls and women have undergone female genital mutilation (FGM), a procedure that usually involves cutting off the clitoris and some of the labia, so this was a remarkable event. Equally remarkable is the story of how Nour came to get the contract and, indeed, of her battle to ensure that her parents stuck to the terms of the deal.

Nour starred in a film adaptation of Desert Flower, the international bestselling autobiography by Somali model and anti-FGM activist Waris Dirie. Published in 1997, her first book follows Dirie from her birth into a nomadic family in Somalia – from whom she fled, aged 13, after her father attempted to marry her to a 60-year-old man – to her becoming an international supermodel.

In 2007, Nour was asked to play the young Dirie as she undergoes FGM – on condition that her parents sign a contract agreeing never to perform the same ritualistic operation on her (keep reading)

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

yagazieemezi:

Khama is a fashion company working with local women in Kasungu, a town in Malawi. Pictured here in traditional Malawian Chitenge skirts, these women attend Khama’s training workshops in tailoring and fashion production. As a social enterprise operating in a developing country, the business has to constantly adapt to practical challenges. The electricity supply can be out for days or hours at a time, so Khama use foot-powered manual sewing machines to prevent stalling production.

Agogo, the oldest group member, used to be a tobacco farmer. She wanted to work with Khama as field-work was physically very demanding and meant she had to travel far away from her children and grandchildren. The Khama workshop is nearer her home, provides a more regular income and enables her to develop her own business.

Keep reading

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

yagazieemezi:

By Life magazine photographer Eliot Elisofon:

  • Twins Seven-Seven and jazz band in 1971, Oshogbo, Nigeria.
  • Fon appliqué workers in 1971, Abomey, Republic of Benin.
  • Weaving a traditional Mangbetu hairstyle in 1970, Medje village, Congo.
  • Nupe bead makers around glass-making furnace in 1959, Bida, Nigeria.
  • Hausa girls, at Zaranda market in 1959, East of Jos, Nigeria.
  • Irigwe dancers in 1959, Miangovillage, Jos Plateau, Nigeria.
  • Workers at Ekulu coal mine in 1959, near Enugu, Nigeria.

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

yagazieemezi:

The following project is called Shujaa Misuli which is Swahili for Muscle Warriors. It is an ingoing project showcasing outstanding sports personalities who have achieved a lot but are least recognised or are being recognised. It is self funded and personal to me.- Osborn Macharia

  1. David Kinjah: Top Kenyan cyclist and world renowned mountain bike rider. He’s responsible for training 2013 Tour De France winner Chris Froome.
  2. Humphrey Kayange: Kenya 7’s sports legend. He has been key in producing some of the best performances in the Kenya 7’s team.
  3. Andrew Amonde: Kenya 7’s rugby captain and captain of KCB ruby team. Guinness ambassador.
  4. Benson Gicharu: Kenya Lightweight boxing champion and Commonwealth Silver holder.
  5. Silalei Shani Owuor: Former Kenyan Women’s Basketball captain.

View more

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

Najivunia kuwa Mkenya

Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.
[Leonardo da Vinci] (via everlytrue)